Here are all the Emmys 2020 winners

The 2020 Emmy Awards proceeded as planned on Sunday — all virtual, but still celebrating the best in a fine year of television (an otherwise un-fine year in every other respect). Hosted by Jimmy Kimmel in Los Angeles, the Emmys honored a variety of TV shows including many first-time nominees and fan favorites like Schitt’s Creek and The Mandalorian.

Check out the full list of winners below.

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie

Jeremy Irons, Watchmen
Hugh Jackman, Bad Education
Paul Mescal, Normal People
Jeremy Pope, Hollywood
Mark Ruffalo, I Know This Much Is True WINNER

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Limited Series or Movie 

Cate Blanchett, Mrs. America
Shira Haas, Unorthodox
Regina King, Watchmen — WINNER
Octavia Spencer, Self Made
Kerry Washington, Little Fires Everywhere

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Limited Series or Movie

Dylan McDermott, Hollywood
Jim Parsons, Hollywood
Titus Burgess, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt
Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, Watchmen
Jovan Adepo, Watchmen
Louis Gossett Jr., Watchmen

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or Movie

Holland Taylor, Hollywood
Uzo Aduba, Mrs. America
Margo Martindale, Mrs. America
Tracey Ullman, Mrs. America
Toni Collette, Unbelievable
Jean Smart, Watchmen

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Andre Braugher, Brooklyn Nine-Nine
William Jackson Harper, The Good Place
Alan Arkin, The Kominstky Method
Sterling K. Brown, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Tony Shalhoub, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Mahershala Ali, Ramy
Kenan Thompson, Saturday Night Live
Daniel Levy, Schitt’s Creek— WINNER

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Betty Gilpin, GLOW
D’Arcy Carden, The Good Place
Yvonne Orji, Insecure
Alex Borstein, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Marin Hinkle, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Kate McKinnon, Saturday Night Live
Cecily Strong, Saturday Night Live
Annie Murphy, Schitt’s Creek — WINNER

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series

Anthony Anderson, Black-ish
Don Cheadle, Black Monday
Ted Danson, The Good Place
Michael Douglas, The Kominsky Method
Eugene Levy, Schitt’s Creek — WINNER
Ramy Youssef, Ramy

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series

Christina Applegate, Dead to Me
Rachel Brosnahan, The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Linda Cardellini, Dead to Me
Catherine O’Hara, Schitt’s Creek — WINNER
Issa Rae, Insecure
Tracee Ellis Ross, Black-ish

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series

Giancarlo Esposito, Better Call Saul
Bradley Whitford, The Handmaid’s Tale
Billy Crudup, The Morning Show
Mark Duplass, The Morning Show
Nicholas Braun, Succession
Kieran Culkin, Succession
Matthew Macfadyen, Succession
Jeffrey Wright, Westworld

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series

Meryl Streep, Big Little Lies
Helena Bonham Carter, The Crown
Samira Wiley, The Handmaid’s Tale
Fiona Shaw, Killing Eve
Julia Garner, Ozark
Sarah Snook, Succession
Thandie Newton, Westworld

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series

Jason Bateman, Ozark
Sterling K. Brown, This Is Us
Steve Carell, The Morning Show
Brian Cox, Succession
Billy Porter, Pose
Jeremy Strong, Succession

Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series

Jennifer Aniston, The Morning Show
Olivia Colman, The Crown
Jodie Comer, Killing Eve
Laura Linney, Ozark
Sandra Oh, Killing Eve
Zendaya, Euphoria

Outstanding Variety Talk Series

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah
Full Frontal with Samantha Bee
Jimmy Kimmel Live
Last Week Tonight with John Oliver — WINNER
The Late Show with Steven Colbert

Outstanding Competition Program

The Masked Singer
Nailed It!
RuPaul’s Drag Race
Top Chef
The Voice

Outstanding Limited Series

Little Fires Everywhere
Mrs. America
Unbelievable
Unorthodox
Watchmen

Outstanding Comedy Series

Curb Your Enthusiasm
Dead to Me
The Good Place
Insecure
The Kominsky Method
The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel
Schitt’s Creek — WINNER
What We Do in the Shadows

Outstanding Drama Series

Better Call Saul
The Crown
The Handmaid’s Tale
Killing Eve
The Mandalorian
Ozark
Stranger Things
Succession

This list will be updated as more winners are announced.

Emmys take a note from baseball, opening with cardboard cutouts of nominees

An awkward opening monologue! Stunt jokes that don’t land! An audience of beautiful people! Who said the Emmys were going to feel weird this year?

Jimmy Kimmel opened the “virtual” 2020 Emmys with a less-than-tight five, noting earnestly that “the world may be terrible but TV has never been better.”

He also foreshadowed a huge night ahead for Schitt’s Creek: noting that he was going to be saying those words a lot, to avoid stirring ABC’s censors from their midcentury cryo pods, the show’s logo would appear onscreen to show that crucial C. “And that’s why network television is dead.” 

Confusingly, Kimmel’s monologue was greeted with effusive laughter from an audience of unmasked, shoulder-to-shoulder stars, from Jon Hamm and Allison Janney to… Jimmy Kimmel? Yes, it was a bit, reusing footage from last year’s ceremony, and the camera panned to a silent Staples Center, empty of all but a few cardboard cutouts and a cranky real-life Jason Bateman, who is nominated for Lead Actor in a Drama Series for Ozark.

“You can stay, but you have to laugh at my jokes,” Kimmel told him.

“I’ll call a car,” Bateman said after a beat, pulling his phone from his tux and placing a cutout of a 30-year-old photo of himself in his seat. “If I win, give it to Cheadle.”

Good to see that even in a pandemic, awards shows stay clunky and self-conscious.

Ramy Youssef’s Emmy loss tweet deserves its own award

The 2020 Emmy Awards are all virtual for safety reasons, but that didn’t stop the Television Academy from sending interns to nominees’ homes to deliver them a winning statuette at a moment’s notice.

That’s a cute idea in theory, but what about the nominees who don’t win? Luckily, we didn’t have to wonder about their fate for long. Ramy creator Ramy Youssef tweeted a video early in the evening of what happens when you lose an Emmy in 2020, and it is nothing if not on-brand for this insane year.

Youssef’s tweet took off immediately, striking people with its hilarity, absurdity, and undertone of bleakness that pervades basically every facet of modern life on Earth.

In the end, even the Television Academy got in on the action.

Taxidermized Squirrel Beer Among Offerings At Disgusting Food Museum

MALMO, Sweden (AP) — Desperate for a drink? There is spit-fermented wine, liquor fermented in prison toilets, and a strong Scottish brew served from the mouth of a taxidermied squirrel.

The Disgusting Food Museum in Malmo, Sweden, which has served up displays of bull testicles and maggot-infested cheese, is now introducing a drinks menu in the form of a temporary exhibition opening Saturday.

Museum director Andreas Ahrens said he wants to encourage people to examine their relationship with alcohol by showing the extreme measures people have taken to concoct mind-altering brews.

“People are very desperate to get drunk around the world,” Ahrens said. “So whenever we find ourselves in a situation where there is no alcohol, we get quite inventive and we’ve been doing this for millennia.”

Most of the drinks on display are beverages that are commonly consumed somewhere in the world but which would revolt outsiders unfamiliar with the taste.

These include bitter herbal liquors like Gammel Dansk, drunk in Denmark, as well as Fernet-Branca, an Italian amaro.

“So much of what we drink is an acquired taste,” Ahrens said.

The museum in the Swedish city of Malmo opened two years ago. The idea was to revolt and to entertain ― but also to provoke reflection on how our notions about what is delicious, or disgusting, are culturally determined.

The dozens of food items on regular display include a bull’s penis, frog smoothies from Peru, a wine made of baby mice that is consumed in China and Korea, and Sweden’s “surstromming,” an infamously putrid fermented herring.

Many of the fermented beverages now being exhibited are equally stomach-churning.

One is an ancient Korean beverage concocted for medicinal purposes from fermented child’s feces and rice.

Ahrens points to a jug with a milky liquid, brewed with the help of a donation produced by his youngest daughter. He explained that the “poo wine” was part of South Korean traditional medicine to help broken bones and bruises, but it is not anything familiar to Koreans today.

Other beverages on display include chicha de muko, which is spit-fermented corn meal beer from Peru, a Ugandan gin made from fermented bananas, and a wine made from an overripe orange fermented in the tank of a prison toilet.

One display tells what happened in the Soviet Union when the government closed alcohol stores to reduce drunkenness: people began drinking perfumes and varnish, leading to the deaths of many.

Another liquid refreshment featured in the exhibition is an Icelandic beer made with whale testicle that’s been smoked in sheep’s dung.

“Some of these things are so normal in some societies. Should it really be that normal?” Ahrens said. “Why don’t we listen to our brains and go, ‘Hey, if this tastes this way, maybe we shouldn’t drink it?’”

At the entrance to the downtown museum, marks on a blackboard indicate each time someone has vomited while visiting. Ahrens corrects a number to read “2 days since last vomit.”

Jan M. Olsen in Copenhagen, Denmark, contributed to this report.

A squirrel malfunctions while eating nuts in the most 2020 mood

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You’re a squirrel. You’re out in the forest doing your nut-gathering thing when suddenly one of those big, fur-less squirrels that walk on two legs kneels down and extends a paw filled with your favorite nut. So you rush over and start helping yourself until, without warning, you just freeze.

That’s what happened with this little rodent from Russia. A person offered it a handful of nuts, and a few nuts in the squirrel just… freezes. It doesn’t appear to be scared, or injured. It just sits there. For almost two whole minutes. Pondering. 

We’ve all been here at some point in 2020, right? Just going about our day, doing whatever needs doing, when suddenly the enormity of the hell-year we’re all living through sets in. And you just freeze, and think.

We feel you, little squirrel. This year has been a lot.

Honestly, I’m just tired.

2020 won’t stop, and I’m exhausted. 

Maybe I should have known this year would be cursed when the New Year’s Eve party I attended missed the countdown to midnight by three minutes — the year has been a downward spiral ever since. On the personal front, my cat died on my 24th birthday, I went through a break up during the loneliest period of modern history, and my apartment flooded three times. 

The world, meanwhile, experienced a string of disasters: a global pandemic is forcing us to completely restructure our way of life, raging wildfires tear up the West Coast and confine those outside of the evacuation zones to our homes because the air is so toxic, and democracy could crumble at any given moment as the president wages war on an app infamous for dancing teenagers ahead of an election. 2020 has been marred by the losses of celebrities like Kobe Bryant, Naya Rivera, and Chadwick Boseman, whose deaths felt especially sudden because they were so young.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death was icing on the cake of a profoundly shitty year. 

Justice Ginsburg was a trailblazer for equality in the United States. She lived an incredibly full life, and leaves behind a powerful legacy of dignity and respect amid a divisive political climate. Justice Ginsburg was a fierce defender of reproductive rights, and her dedication was unmatched. She even participated in several Supreme Court hearings from her hospital bed; in May, she defended cost-free contraceptive coverage while recovering from a gallstone. Despite her age, battle with cancer, and judicial duties, she still managed to maintain a workout routine. Regardless of politics, Justice Ginsburg was an inspiration. 

While the news of her death is heartbreaking, especially for the women who looked up to her, I had been bracing for it for the last few years. Justice Ginsburg had fought colon, lung, liver, and pancreatic cancer. She was aging. It was inevitable. I thought I would be better prepared for the loss, but I still felt deflated.

There are others who are experiencing grief more tangibly in wake of Justice Ginsburg’s death, but as someone who’s skeptical of worshipping public figures, I’m mostly just tired. 

The grief I’m experiencing isn’t quite grief. It isn’t quite despair, either. It’s more a quiet, overwhelming exhaustion that creeps into every aspect of existing and clings to my day to day. It’s grief compounded over the entirety of 2020, growing larger and stickier with every tragedy this year tosses at us. I’ve learned to stop saying, “It can’t get worse than this!” because it does, in fact, get worse than this. 

Describing this sensation as depression doesn’t feel right. I was diagnosed with major depression and generalized anxiety disorder in college, and have spent a majority of my adult life being treated for it. Major depression is characterized by a severe and persistent low mood, a loss of interest or pleasure in life, and an ongoing sense of despair. Exhaustion is a common symptom as well, but none of my depressive episodes have put me in a state like this before. This state of being seems to be a universal experience. 

I’ve been describing this feeling as the “hell zone,” a sudden dip in mood and energy that’s unique to existing through this pandemic. In April, comedian Dan Sheehan described the hell zone as an “anxious, semi-agitated state where you’re just sorta ‘off’ for the whole day and time flows like you’re wading through chili.” It tends to follow an otherwise normal feeling period of a few days when you can almost forget about everything that happened this year. 

Despite promises of a vaccine and a return to normalcy, the last few months of 2020 are looking bleak, and the hell zones I’ve been falling into are more frequent than they were when social distancing began. My coworkers and I have been referring to the days of decreased productivity, gentle dissociation, and overwhelming exhaustion as hell zone days, because this is so widely felt.

It’s easy to wax poetic about honoring Justice Ginsburg’s legacy by continuing her fight for equality. The sense of despair over possibly losing our civil liberties should galvanize all of us into activism if we haven’t been doing so already. 

Following the news of her death, I checked my voter registration to make sure I’ll receive my mail-in ballot in time for the election. I made sure my family had theirs all squared away, too. I donated to another bail fund for protesters fighting against police brutality and systemic racism, even though Justice Ginsburg had some outdated stances on race. I briefly considered getting a copper IUD, which is effective for 10 years, and stockpiling Plan B in case reproductive rights are stripped away by a conservative-led Supreme Court. 

Justice Ginsburg’s last wishes were weighted by a similar urgency. In her last days, she told her granddaughter, “My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.” 

But the morning after her death, I fell back into the hell zone. Time felt warped, moving both too fast and too slowly. I chugged a latte loaded with espresso shots and even though my heart was racing with the sheer amount of caffeine I consumed, I still felt tired. There was objectively nothing wrong, so why did I wake up so easily annoyed? It’s just the hell zone. 

Existing in a constant state of crisis is exhausting. I am, of course, immensely privileged. I have a salaried job during some of the worst unemployment rates in American history. My home in California is not threatened by wildfires. While so much of the world struggles with loneliness during social distancing, I have a tight knit quarantine bubble that keeps me somewhat sane. I’m not an essential worker who has to interact with the public amid increasing COVID cases. My medications are covered by insurance, for now. 

That being said, I find it greatly comforting to let myself despair every now and then. This capitalist hell we live in encourages productivity and looks down on spending the whole day curled up in a depression nest. 

It’s almost easier to ignore that sticky exhaustion that comes with the hell zone, and distract yourself with working and hobbies and organizing for progressive causes. But you’ll have to take a break from it eventually, and you’ll have to contend with the fact that everything just sucks right now. That’s not to say that you can’t find joy in this bleak quarantine — I’ve picked up new hobbies, adopted two sweet cats, and finally started medications to treat my mental health. That compounding grief, though, will continue to grow with each tragic event this year manages to spawn. 

During our weekly sessions, my therapist reminds me that it’s perfectly fine to feel exhausted and defeated. Sometimes, it’s all you can feel, and you have to let it wash over you before you can begin feeling anything else. Some call it self care, and others might call it laziness. For me, accepting the fact that I’m in the hell zone gives me a chance to recharge. 

Is it enjoyable? Not particularly. I’d rather not deal with it at all, but suppressing this ongoing exhaustion will only make it worse. You do not need to be on top of it all of the time. 

When I let myself really settle into the hell zone, I’ll sequester myself in my bedroom for the night without doing the errands I planned for the day. I’ll smoke enough weed to get cozy, burrow in my comforter, and play Animal Crossing until I fall asleep. I’ll ignore messages until the next morning, and when I emerge from my self-imposed hermitage, I’ll be ready for another handful of days without the hell zone. I think of these nights as controlled depressive episodes – if I indulge in these every now and then, I won’t fall into an actual depressive episode. 

A lot of people don’t have the luxury of hell zone nights like mine. I’m not responsible for small humans like many parents dealing with a lack of childcare are, and I don’t work overnight. Sinking into the hell zone doesn’t necessarily require blocking off a whole night. You can let yourself be in the hell zone in a variety of ways, whether it’s having a good shower cry or indulging in a late night ice cream. The most radical thing about hell zone moments is that they’re a rejection of productivity. 

If Justice Ginsburg’s death sparked a fresh wave of energy and you’re ready to take action, by all means do it. If you’re dealing with this ongoing, dull exhaustion like me (and you probably are, given the state of the world right now) sit with it. Take a moment, or a few hours, to really soak it in. Maybe this year will get better. It’ll probably get worse. Let yourself wallow in the hell zone for a bit. Once you emerge, you’ll be ready to tackle whatever shit 2020 has in store for the rest of the year. 

Lindsey Graham said in 2016 to use his words against him. Twitter followed through.

Senator Lindsey Graham’s own words are being used against him, thanks to old videos recirculating on Twitter. 

Graham is the chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, the cohort of senators who review judicial nominations. In the wake of Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s death, he’s facing pressure to reject any nominee chosen by Donald Trump to take Justice Ginsburg’s seat. Ginsburg was a progressive on a largely conservative court, and any nominee Trump puts forward is sure to be conservative as well. 

In years past, Graham has repeatedly insisted that Supreme Court vacancies should remain vacant during election years so the next president has a chance to fill them. When President Barack Obama nominated Merrick Garland to the Supreme Court to fill Justice Antonin Scalia’s seat in 2016, Graham led the opposition against the nomination. 

“I want you to use my words against me,” Graham said during a 2016 Senate meeting. “If there’s a Republican president in 2016 and a vacancy occurs in the last year of the first term, you can say Lindsey Graham said let’s let the next president, whoever it might be, make that nomination.”

In the video, which resurfaced hours after Justice Ginsburg’s death was announced, Graham added that he was setting a precedent for future Supreme Court nominations.  

“We’re setting a precedent here today, Republicans are, that in the last year…that you’re not gonna fill a vacant seat of the Supreme Court based on what we’re doing here today,” Graham continued. “That’s gonna be the new rule.” 

He affirmed his stance in a video posted to Twitter as well, recorded after Graham met with Garland. The video was thoroughly ratio’d following Ginsburg’s death. 

Twitter users took the videos as leverage against Graham, who’s running for reelection against Democrat Jaime Harrison for his South Carolina Senate seat. Support for Harrison has surged as the election draws closer, with both candidates polling at 48 percent. Many expressed skepticism that Graham would stay true to his word if Trump nominates a replacement for Ginsburg. 

Graham has not publicly commented on the video’s resurgence. In a tweet on Saturday, he promised, using shaky justification blaming past Democrat actions, to support Trump “in any effort to move forward regarding the recent vacancy created by the passing of Justice Ginsburg.”

Twitter users, though, kept their word.

UK Museum Removes Shrunken Heads From Display

LONDON (AP) — Oxford University’s Pitt Rivers Museum has removed its famous collection of shrunken heads and other human remains from display as part of a broader effort to “decolonize” its collections.

The museum, known as one of the world’s leading institutions for anthropology, ethnography and archaeology, had faced charges of racism and cultural insensitivity because it continued to display the items.

“Our audience research has shown that visitors often saw the museum’s displays of human remains as a testament to other cultures being ‘savage’, ‘primitive’ or ‘gruesome’,” museum director Laura Van Broekhoven said. “Rather than enabling our visitors to reach a deeper understanding of each other’s ways of being, the displays reinforced racist and stereotypical thinking that goes against the museum’s values today.’’

The decision comes at a time when the Black Lives Matter movement has led to a re-examination of the British Empire and the objects carried away from conquered lands. Oxford itself has been the site of such protests, where demonstrators demanded the removal of a statue of Victorian imperialist Cecil Rhodes.

Some of the 130-year-old museum’s collection, including the human remains, was acquired during the expansion of the British Empire in line with a colonial mandate to collect and classify objects from all over the world.

The museum said it began an ethical review of its collection in 2017. This included discussions with the Universidad de San Francisco in Quito, Peru, and representatives of the Shuar indigenous community about the so-called shrunken heads, known as tsantsa by the Shuar.

The museum ultimately decided to remove 120 human remains, including the tsantsas, Naga trophy heads and an Egyptian mummy of a child.

When Pitt Rivers closed during the COVID-19 pandemic, staff took the opportunity to make the changes. The museum reopens Sept. 22 with interpretive displays explaining why the items were removed, new labels on many artifacts and a discussion of how historic labels sometimes obscured understanding of the cultures that produced them.

“A lot of people might think about the removal of certain objects or the idea of restitution as a loss, but what we are trying to show is that we aren’t losing anything but creating space for more expansive stories,” said Marenka Thompson-Odlum, a research associate who curated several of the new displays. “That is at the heart of decolonization.”

The human remains have been moved into storage. The museum says it plans to reach out to descendant communities around the world about how to care for some 2,800 human remains that remain in its care.

Read all AP stories on racial injustice at https://apnews.com/Racialinjustice.

Oxford University’s Pitt Rivers Museum has removed its famous collection of shrunken heads and other human remains from displ



Hugh Warwick/Pitt Rivers Museum, University of Oxford via AP

Oxford University’s Pitt Rivers Museum has removed its famous collection of shrunken heads and other human remains from display as part of a broader effort to “decolonize” its collections.

Icon, champion, Supreme Court Justice: Ruth Bader Ginsburg dies at 87

At a time of great conflict, stress, and uncertainty in the U.S., Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg died Friday, sending her supporters into a state of shock on social media.

Ginsburg, a beloved figure who was famous for her historic career as much as her workout routine that inspired Saturday Night Live sketches, died due to “complications of metastatic pancreas cancer,” according to a Supreme Court statement as reported by the New York Times. She was 87.

It had become a bitter Twitter joke, something said as an aside at gatherings, back when we could still gather: Stay healthy, RBG, don’t pass before Election Day. She became a symbol for justice and dignity, as the country swirled into hatred and division during the Trump administration.

Days before she died, according to NPR, she told her granddaughter, “My most fervent wish is that I will not be replaced until a new president is installed.”

A week before she died, President Trump announced a list of possible Supreme Court nominees.

Ginsburg’s supporters almost immediately began calling for action upon hearing of her loss. “May her memory be a revolution,” said Amanda Littman, executive director of Run For Something, which encourages young people to seek office. “Choose fight over fear,” said SNL writer Paula Pell. “We gon fight. That’s what we’re gonna do,” said Brittany Packnett Cunningham, co-founder of Campaign Zero, which fights to end police brutality.

Former President Bill Clinton nominated Ginsburg to the Supreme Court in 1993. She was the second woman to become a Supreme Court Justice. After Justice Sandra Day O’Connor retired in 2006, she was the lone woman justice until Former President Barack Obama nominated Justice Sonia Stomayor in 2009.

Before being nominated, she was a prominent women’s rights activist who fought for equal rights and constitutional protections against sex discrimination. She did so several times in front of the Supreme Court prior to taking the bench. Her fight in one case set in a lower court, where she argued that her client, a man, should be able to receive a tax deduction for the nursing care of his elderly mother despite the law limiting such a deduction to women and widowers, got the Hollywood treatment in 2018’s On the Basis of Sex. That 1970 case, a minor one in her storied career, was just one of dozens of sex discrimination cases she championed. 

Two years later, she co-founded the ACLU’s Women’s Rights Project and Columbia University Law School granted her tenure, making her the first woman to receive the title.